When a Foreign National Dies with Assets in New York, What Happens?

By | All, Estates, Trusts and Private Clients, Featured, International, Publications

Update on What Wealth Advisors, Legal Advisors, and Globetrotters Need to Know

Susan Rothwell, Partner

September 26, 2019

If you’re a foreign national with ties to New York, you may own an apartment or a house, or have bank and investment accounts located here.  Whether you are an individual who bought an apartment for a child in college or an art aficionado getting an appraisal from Christie’s or Sotheby’s, it is worth considering what happens to these assets on death.  How do the next of kin or beneficiaries get access to the property?  What are the tax consequences? Read More

PRESS RELEASE: Dunnington Announces Launch of Guide To Doing Business in the United States

By | All, Corporate, Estates, Trusts and Private Clients, Featured, Firm News, Immigration, Intellectual Property, Advertising, Art and Fashion Law, Litigation, Arbitration and Mediation, Real Estate

WHEN:                  September 17, 2019 6:00 PM
WHERE:                230 Park Avenue, 21st Floor

NEW YORK–Dunnington Bartholow & Miller LLP, a full-service New York City-based law firm serving the international community announced today the publication of Doing Business in the United States, a guide to assist business leaders, startups and individuals in navigating the most important business law issues facing foreign investors and entrepreneurs in the coming years.  The launch will be celebrated with an event for journalist members of the Foreign Press Association.

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Client Alert: What You Should Know About the USPTO’s Foreign Applicant U.S. Counsel Requirement

By | All, Client Alerts, Featured, Intellectual Property, Advertising, Art and Fashion Law

Valerie Oyakhilome, Paralegal

August 30, 2019

On August 3rd, 2019, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) took unprecedented action by implementing a new rule that directly impacts the meaning of compliance in the application process for both current and prospective trademark owners. Read More

Trademark Bulletin August 2019

By | All, Featured, Intellectual Property, Advertising, Art and Fashion Law, Trademark Bulletins

Federal Court Affirms Luxury Eyewear Manufacturer’s $1.9M Win Over Flea Market

On August 7, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit upheld the ruling of a Georgia jury awarding $1.9 million to Luxottica finding the landlord of an indoor flea market in Georgia liable for contributory trademark infringement when the landlord had “constructive” knowledge of the subtenants’ sale of counterfeit eyewear, including knockoffs of Ray-Ban and Oakley brands. Read More

Trademark Bulletin July 2019

By | All, Featured, Intellectual Property, Advertising, Art and Fashion Law, Publications, Trademark Bulletins

U.S. Supreme Court Finds USPTO’s Bar on Offensive Trademarks Unconstitutional

On June 24, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled by a 6-3 vote that a federal law banning the registration of “immoral or scandalous” trademarks violates the First Amendment. In Iancu v. Brunetti, the court found in favor of Eric Brunetti, a Los Angeles streetwear designer who attempted to register the name of his 30-year-old brand, FUCT. Read More

Trademark Bulletin May 2019

By | All, Featured, Intellectual Property, Advertising, Art and Fashion Law, Publications, Trademark Bulletins

Fashion Law Scotus Case: Trademarks and Continuing Infringements

Dunnington trademark team members Olivera Medenica, Raymond J. Dowd and Sixtine Bousquet-Lambert recently authored a Supreme Court brief on a trademark issue pertinent to the fashion industry. On June 20, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether to grant a petition for certiorari filed by Lucky Brand Dungarees in Lucky Brand Dungarees, Inc., et al., v. Marcel Fashions Group, Inc. Dunnington represents respondent Marcel Fashions Group, Inc. who is opposing the petition. At issue in the case is whether, in an action to enforce a trademark infringement judgment, a defendant who continues with the exact same infringements can collaterally attack a prior judgment with a defense that it raised in that prior action but deliberately chose not to prosecute.

You can read more about the case here. Read More